Parresia Blog |
5178
home,paged,page-template,page-template-blog-small-image,page-template-blog-small-image-php,page,page-id-5178,paged-18,page-paged-18,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-title-hidden,qode_grid_1300,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,qode-theme-ver-11.0,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.1.1,vc_responsive

I received a call from Mrs Primoh (whom I had mistakenly called Shola)  sometime in May, extending an invitation to two writers from Parrésia Publishers - Richard Ali and Abubakar Adam Ibrahim - to read on the Laipo platform in Ibadan on the 2nd of June. Ayodele Olofintuade  and I had been talking about this reading before the Plagiarism disagreement started  and we were looking forward to it. So I confirmed attendance on behalf of these two authors and let them know. Not long after, Ayo called to ask if...

By Julius Bokoru City of Memories follows the ill-timed love affair of the children of two rivalling political colossus, Eunice Pam and Ibrahim Dibarama, in the north central state of Plateau. The book is set in an alternate reality where there is a junta in present day Nigeria. The feud, spanning for decades, between these titans would catch up with their hapless children – the conservative Faruk, son of Ibrahim Dibarama and the idealistic Rahila, daughter of the powerful Eunice Pam – consequently leading to the subtle, yet explosive scheme of...

First Published by Sentinel Quarterly Written by Alison Lock We are lured into a world suffused with colour, heat, and energy.  The stories are reminiscent of folk tales and fables where some of the characters have the qualities of angels, witches and medicine men.  In contrast, they are set in a modern world that is both domestic and mystical.  Through these sensitively evoked characters the author gives us a glimpse of life in Nigeria portraying a country of both poverty and vibrancy.  The characters are well conceived and through their development they tell us much...

DADA books proudly presents a remarkable collection of short stories: The Funeral Did Not End, by Sylva Nze Ifedigbo.     In The Funeral Did Not End, there are 20 punchy stories, adroitly written by a tempered writer who has successfully merged his penchant for social commentary with his capacity for observing that same society with a keen eye and a mind that understands perfectly well, how to negotiate the threshold where the profound meets the mundane. Trained as a Veterinary Doctor at University of Nigeria Nsukka, Sylva Nze Ifedigbo who now works in Coporate...

First published by National Mirror The first time I came in contact with the book, The Whispering Trees by emerging author, Abubakar Adam Ibrahim, I was at a public reading where excerpts from it were read. That first contact left me longing for more. They say a sweet soup is perceived by the aroma it leaves in the air. Few lines heard from The Whispering Trees left me curious, yearning for a full reading. And when I did, I could not but say that I had seen something awesome, something new, something...

By Mazi Fred Nwonwu Immediately I finished reading Emmanuel Iduma’s novel Farad, I felt the need to tell others about it. Not as a professional reviewer, that I am not, but as a reader pleased with a book bought with hard-earned Naira. I write with a thought gnawing at the back of my mind that Farad should be left for the reader to discover; as such, I will try not to give too much away. You know how you at times stand on a balcony, watching strangers go by; wondering...

Listen to Richard Ali, author of City of Memories, on the Smooth Book Review this Saturday, September 1, 2012, at 10AM  on SMOOTH 98.1 FM Lagos . He will be talking about his book and his writing. Questions will be directed at him from several angles. You'd surely want to hear the answers that he proffers. You'd want to know why City of Memories doesn't include any depiction of sex, despite being a love story. You'd also like to listen to Richard Ali as he talks about writing alternate history, and...

First published HERE By Onyeka Nwelue Nigerian writing is best known for its intensely beautiful storytelling, wrapped on personal journeys and narcissistic tales. It has so many challenges, from generation to generation. Now, a new generation of writers is making its mark, from poetry to fiction. Much has changed since Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie wrote Purple Hibiscus. Helen Oyeyemi captured the world with Icarus Girl and made lots of money. A number of ambitious young Nigerian writers began to appear on the scene keen enough to experiment with new storytelling techniques – and practically reach...

By Dami Ajayi One might begin by stating the obvious: both authors are Nigerians and trained professionals though in different endeavours—Mr. Imasuen is a medical doctor, Mr. Iduma is a lawyer. One cannot however say for certain if both are practicing and this might not be important; it suffices to say that they are both locally published novelists. There has been a hitherto unattended gap in Nigeria’s literary landscape. Few books have addressed the milieu of dictatorship especially in the 90s save Helon Habila’s Waiting for Angel. Farad and Fine...

Culled from The Guardian Nigeria Poet and prose fiction writer Helon Habila is currently home on summer break. It ought to be a vacation but Habila’s life of writing is seemingly restless. Early last month he had return from his base in the USA — where he  lectures in creative writing at the George Mason University — staged yet another edition of his yearly creative writing workshop for young writers who converged from all over the country in Lagos. Later in the month, he was one of the star guests...

ThemeTF Bridge - Creative Multi-Purpose WordPress Theme Download Free